“ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IN THE LATINO COMMUNITY AND THE CHALLENGES WE FACE”

When:
October 15, 2013 @ 9:30 am – 3:00 pm America/New York Timezone
2013-10-15T09:30:00-04:00
2013-10-15T15:00:00-04:00
Where:
234 East 149th Street
Bronx, NY 10451
USA
Cost:
Free

 “ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IN THE LATINO COMMUNITY AND THE CHALLENGES WE FACE”

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 from 9:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Lincoln Hospital (234 East 149th Street – Auditorium), BRONX

REGISTRATION:  Admission is FREE but reservations are necessary. Register at

http://www.alznyc.org/nyc/events/adlc.asp.

New York City Chapter and Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center will host a special presentation on Alzheimer’s in the Latino community and the challenges it presents. All New Yorkers are invited to attend.

This presentation will feature bilingual breakout sessions, led by staff from the Alzheimer’s Association, New York City Chapter on topics including Alzheimer’s and wandering, caregiver health, training and  education, and free Alzheimer’s services available to the Latino community. The presentation will take place at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx.

Dr. José A. Luchsinger, MD MPH., Associate Professor of Medicine & Associate Professor of  Epidemiology with the Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center and the Taub Institute at New York Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University Medical Center will be the guest speaker.

Roberto Reyes, Latino Outreach Manager, Alzheimer’s Association, New York City Chapter, will speak about the importance of support groups for the Latino community.

There is no fee for participating but reservations are necessary. To register, visit

http://www.alznyc.org/nyc/events/adlc.asp. The Chapter will also have an Alzheimer’s Information and Care Consultant Table set up at the health fair with materials available.

Alzheimer’s is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States and the only cause of death among the  top ten in the United States that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed.  Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are projected to increase six-fold among Hispanics in the U.S. by 2050.  This means that 1.3 million Hispanics will have the disease by the first half of the 21st century, as compared to 200,000 currently living with the disease.

By |2013-10-07T18:29:57+00:00October 7th, 2013|Comments Off on “ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IN THE LATINO COMMUNITY AND THE CHALLENGES WE FACE”